At the Well

Posted on: January 10, 2011 Written by
At the Well
Photography by: edenwithin from iStock          

I enjoy watching the local community life that goes on outside our window.  People who live nearby hang out in the courtyard of our building at least a couple of times a day when the water comes on and the common tap that supplies water begins to flow (ours gets pumped to a tank on the roof during these times).  It has been fun to observe their individual personalities, hear the clinking and clanging of pots and pans, and listen to the chatting and laughter.

There are arguments, too, sometimes quite heated.  Before too long, however, it goes back to the general sharing of lives, teasing, and playfulness.

You see, while they represent different personalities, families, types of employment, and so on, they have to work it out and get along—because they all share the same source of water!

I have been learning a lot about fellowship in the Body of Christ as well, since we live in close community with co-workers.  They are an awesome group of people, and we get along really well, but in a practical way it has brought Romans 12:9-18 to life.  Statements like, Don’t just pretend to love others.  Really love them, take on a deeper meaning when you are around “them” 24-7 while overheated and overworked.  Do things in such a way that everyone can see you are honorable has even more impact because the 20 women from the business in which we minister work right across a small balcony from my kitchen and living room; they can easily assess the atmosphere of what is going on in our home.

In a broader perspective, this has made me more aware of our call to live that way in every aspect of our lives.  We are all so different; we have different goals, dreams, callings on our lives, preferences, things we do or do not enjoy—but  we really SHOULD get along.

Why?  We too share the same Source of Water.

©2014 Thrive. 

 



About the author

Heather P. serves in India. “A recent book that I've learned a lot from: When Helping Hurts by Corbetta and Fikkert.”

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